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Nausea usually begins around week six of a pregnancy, but can start as early as week four. Thankfully, women generally find relief around the 14th week. However, these few months of severe and unpredictable nausea can be a real challenge to live with for many women. The problem with nausea and vomiting during pregnancy is that no one knows for sure what causes it. A woman’s body goes through many physical changes during pregnancy. From rising hormones to an enhanced sense of smell, anything can bring on a sudden wave of nausea.

Consistent scientific evidence has shown that taking a multivitamin around the time of conception can decrease the severity of pregnancy nausea. Vitamin B6 with or without doxylamine is safe to take during pregnancy and is quite effective at treating symptoms early on. Remember to eat before or as soon as you get hungry. An empty stomach can bring on nausea quickly. You may want to eat frequent low-fat, high-carb meals to keep from vomiting.

There are other treatments such as Lemon-drop candies may keep the nausea down, as well as as Powdered ginger is also reported to have a positive effect on nausea. Take antid=opaminergic medications such as reglan, compazine, phenergan, as well as, anti-serotonergic medications such as zofran, has been shown to be safe and effective for refractory cases. In severe cases, steroids such as methylprednisolone can be prescribed, though it is only used as a last resort due to the potentially harmful side effects of the steroid.

The best thing to do when it comes to fighting pregnancy nausea is to find the ways you avoid it. We recommend you keep track of your surroundings whenever you feel nausea coming on. With enough experiences, you may notice a specific trigger that could have caused nausea. For some women, the smell of fried food can spark that queasy feeling. Other women notice that stuffy rooms and heat bring on their sickness. Brushing your teeth, smelling perfume, and consuming too much iron are all examples of triggers that women have reported. It is simply a matter of finding your trigger and avoiding it.

Frequently Asked Questions:

What is morning sickness?

During pregnancy, many women experience nausea and vomiting. This is called “morning sickness.” Despite what its name suggests, it is not a disease and it can occur at any time of the day. It is also commonly referred to as “pregnancy nausea” to avoid this confusion.

What causes it?

The exact cause of pregnancy nausea remains a mystery, though many professionals believe it to be related to increased levels of hormones during pregnancy. With this information, doctors have been able to help treat women with pregnancy nausea.

Can pregnancy nausea harm my baby?

Most cases of pregnancy nausea are relatively harmless and will eventually go away. However, if your morning sickness prevents you from keeping your food down to the point of losing weight, you and your baby can be at risk.

Can I prevent morning sickness?

Women experience morning sickness differently, so there is no sure way to completely prevent morning sickness. Anything can trigger nausea, so finding out what causes you to feel sick and avoiding it can be a great way to avoid it. Try the following to see if your morning sickness eases up:

  • Take multivitamins regularly
  • Rest frequently
  • Avoid irritating smells
  • Eat five to six smaller meals in a day instead of the usual three
  • Avoid spicy or fatty foods
  • Eat crackers when you wake up in the morning

Other reported preventative measures range from acupuncture to hypnosis, but few of these are supported by significant scientific evidence. Speak with Dr. Ayalon before trying any treatments or taking medication.

Can my morning sickness be treated?

Most cases of morning sickness should not be treated, only prevented. In serious cases, however, you may need medical treatment in order for you and your baby to stay healthy. Dr. Ayalon can recommend vitamin B6, doxylamine, or anti-nausea medications. If your sickness keeps you from eating regularly, Dr. Ayalon may have you receive fluids through an intravenous line and stay in a hospital until you are healthy.

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